For Atmosphere, glass tubes filled with argon and neon simulated the color of the Arizona sky. Arranged as a column, these tubes altered the shadows of visitors, casting them in pillar-form. The space was designed to respond to the actions of its inhabitants, encouraging them to investigate, play with and probe the air.

Looking Back

Atmosphere  |  2015  |  Installation: gas discharge tubes (argon & neon), acrylic fixtures, transformers, programmable dimmers, white room  |  21’x9’ (diameter & height)

Aura  |  2015  |  Installation:  glass microspheres, concrete, sunlight  |  16’ (diameter)

Scottsdale Museum of Contemporary Art | Scottsdale, AZ

 For Atmosphere, glass tubes filled with argon and neon simulated the color of the Arizona sky. Arranged as a column, these tubes altered the shadows of visitors, casting them in pillar-form. The space was designed to respond to the actions of its inhabitants, encouraging them to investigate, play with and probe the air.

For Atmosphere, glass tubes filled with argon and neon simulated the color of the Arizona sky. Arranged as a column, these tubes altered the shadows of visitors, casting them in pillar-form. The space was designed to respond to the actions of its inhabitants, encouraging them to investigate, play with and probe the air.

 Atmosphere | Study for Light Column, 2015

Atmosphere | Study for Light Column, 2015

Atmosphere

 Atmosphere | Exterior

Atmosphere | Exterior


 Atmosphere | Study for Structure, 2014

Atmosphere | Study for Structure, 2014

 Aura was similarly concerned with relocating an atmospheric phenomenon to the ground. Flying into Phoenix in the spring of 2014, I first witnessed the phenomenon known as a “glory.” On some low-lying clouds, the shadow of my airplane was framed by an unbroken halo. For this installation, I simulated that cloud cover by scattering engineered glass beads on a slab of concrete, mimicking the prismatic quality of raindrops. In this environment, a person’s shadow was always accompanied by a halo.  Image courtesy Sean Deckert

Aura was similarly concerned with relocating an atmospheric phenomenon to the ground. Flying into Phoenix in the spring of 2014, I first witnessed the phenomenon known as a “glory.” On some low-lying clouds, the shadow of my airplane was framed by an unbroken halo. For this installation, I simulated that cloud cover by scattering engineered glass beads on a slab of concrete, mimicking the prismatic quality of raindrops. In this environment, a person’s shadow was always accompanied by a halo.

Image courtesy Sean Deckert

 Aura | Study, 2014

Aura | Study, 2014